AndreevKP

Andreev Konstantin Petrovich
(02.10.1853–1919)

Military hydrograph.
Born in Revel in the family of a naval officer. After graduating from the naval school in 1872 with the rank of midshipman, he conducted hydrographic work in the Baltic Sea. In 1878 he graduated from the hydrographic department of the Nikolaev Maritime Academy and continued work on the Baltic Sea as a lieutenant.
In 1881, preparations began for the 1st IPY and as part of its organization of the Russian polar station on Novaya Zemlya. When discussing the issue of the station manager, Andreev was chosen from among three candidates, whose name was given by N.L. Pushchin, who presented him as the best officer of his expedition. This choice was supported by academician M.A. Rykachev and the head of the Hydrographic Department, Lieutenant-General Corp of naval navigators F.F. Veselago.

Being seconded to the Imperial Russian Geographical Society, Andreev in 1882–1883 headed the Russian International Polar Station on Novaya Zemlya, and then for three years engaged in the processing of the materials received. In 1887, he supervised the hydrographic party, which carried out the survey and survey of Lake Onega.

In 1888, Andreev was appointed head of a separate survey of the Eastern Ocean. Until 1893, under his leadership, hydrographic work was carried out in the  Peter the Great Bay, on South Sakhalin, at Moneron Island and in the Amur estuary. During this period, he repeatedly lectured at the Society for the Study of the Amur Region.

 

Amderma Village

(photo by O. Smirnov)


Since 1894, Andreev headed the Special Survey of the Black Sea, first with the rank of lieutenant colonel, then colonel and major general of the Corp of naval navigators.
In 1908, the rank of lieutenant general was dismissed.
The merits of Andreev were awarded orders of St. Stanislav 2 and 3 degrees, St. Vladimir 3 and 4 degrees, St. Anna 2 and 3 degrees.
He died of starvation in Petrograd, buried in the Smolensk Orthodox cemetery.
Cape in the Kara Sea east of Amderma. Named in 1901, by the hydrographic expedition of the Arctic Ocean  under the leadership of A.I. Varnek.

 

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