Dahl Eilif

(07.12.1916 - 17.03./1993)

 

Norwegian botanist, florist, phytogeographer, ecologist, systematist of wildlife, author of the names of a number of botanical taxons, professor at the Norwegian Higher School of Agriculture.

Dahl studied lichens and vascular plants. His first scientific research focused on plant systematics and floristics, but over time he became increasingly interested in phytosociological theory and, ultimately, phytogeography. Dahl sought to explain the relationships that determine the influence of the environment on the physiological responses of organisms, based on the range of the species. Dahl is also known as a conservationist who was one of the first to raise questions about the dangers of acid rain and global warming long before such fears passed into the general consciousness.

His research activities began in 1936 with the collection of lichen collections in Svalbard and King Charles' Land, in 1937 in Greenland.

His research activities began in 1936 with the collection of lichen collections in Svalbard and King Charles' Land, in 1937 in Greenland.

In 1946, New Phytologist published an article on the different types of areas released from glaciation and their significance for phytogeography in the journal New Phytologist .

From 1946 to 1951 he continued his studies at the University of Oslo. In 1951-1954 he visited Great Britain and the United States of America.

In 1956, Dahl received a Ph.D. in the Norwegian Higher School of Agriculture, where in the same year he became an assistant professor, and from 1965 - a professor of botany.

In 1973, together with G. Krog, he published a summary of Macrolichens of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden (Macrolichens of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden).

He died in Ose. In 1998, Dahl’s main work, Phytogeography of Northern Europe, was published posthumously.

A small bay and valley in the very south- west edge of the Edge, Spitsbergen. Coordinates 77° 26.8'N   20° 56.8'E.

 

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