Dolgushin Ivan Alekseevich 
(01.07.1926-1974)


Arctic hydrograph, honorary polar explorer. 
Born in the village Kuznetsovo, Omsk region. Before the war he moved to Nizhny Tagil, graduated from high school and with honors in 1946 from the Mining and Metallurgical Technical School, specializing in mining electro-mechanics. He worked in the mine, and in 1949 he entered WAMU, received a specialty engineer-hydrograph, which determined his remaining life. 
Dolgushin was sent to GP GUSMP to the position of chief engineer of the Dikson hydro base. In 1964, he became her boss. 
The life of the Arctic hydrograph, by definition, is full of the hardest, often exhausting work with constant physical overloads, requiring tremendous patience, endurance, the ability to come to the aid of a friend, not to panic in any situations. All these qualities possessed Dolgushin. In the winter of 1959, as a navigator, he participated in a lengthy tractor-sledge transition from Dixon to Cape Chelyuskin, which marked the beginning of large ice crossings of hydrographs. 850 km were covered in 22 days. Dolgushin played a huge role in the successful outcome of this extremely difficult, risky enterprise. It was necessary to go both in the bitter cold and in a blizzard with almost zero visibility. 
Often, Dolgushin had to leave the warm cabin of an all-terrain vehicle and go ahead with a compass. In order not to get lost, he attached to the hood of the car. It seemed that he was pulling the caravan, overcoming the headwind. When meeting with open water, Dolgushin always had a supply of logs and materials, immediately began building the crossing. 
Most of his short life Dolgushin spent on Taimyr, making an invaluable contribution to the mapping of its shores. 
He spent the end of his life in warm Odessa, but this period turned out to be very short. 
In Odessa, Dolgushin died, and was buried there.

Cape in the Taimyr Gulf of the Kara Sea. The name was approved by the decision of the Krasnoyarsk Regional Executive Committee of February 25, 1976.

 

Return to the main page