Kurnikov Ivan Dmitrievich 
(1913–25.09.1950)


Arctic hydrograph. 
Born in Karelia in the family of a peasant. After graduating from the seven years, in 1929 Kurnikov arrived in Leningrad and entered the Hydrotechnical Technical School. His production activities began in 1934 in the Northern Hydrographic Expedition of the Navy, where he was sent to the list of freelancers. He worked as a foreman and senior foreman before the dismissal of staff reductions in 1940. The following year, Kurnikov became an employee of the GU GUMP and, by January 1943, he worked as a senior hydrograph in the Yansk fishery. Since March 1943, he is already a senior hydrograph of the Tiksi hydro base. As stated in the description, Kournikova was distinguished by a calm, somewhat even phlegmatic character, he had good organizational skills, was initiative, worked without regard for difficulties and time. 
After the war, the most active, almost without interruption expeditionary life of Kurnikov with annual wintering continued. He performed the duties of a senior hydrograph on the hydrographic vessel "Cirkul", a senior hydrograph and head of the survey party of the expedition on Bolshevik Island, head of the survey party on New Siberia Island. His last, tragically ended expedition was part of Expedition No. 4 on the northeast coast of Novaya Zemlya in the Bay of Well-Being. On the morning of September 25, Kurnikov, the head of the surveyed party, was found dead in his bed. The diagnosis is death in a dream due to asphyxiation after the incident on the eve of emergency loading and unloading and after-dinner. That turned out to be well-being. In one room with Kournikov lived I.Ya. Dobkin, who died four years later in Franz Josef Land. 
He was buried at Cape Stony in the Bay of Well-being on Novaya Zemlya. A wooden obelisk and an inscription board were installed on the grave. 
Bay on the island of Alexandra Land archipelago Franz-Josef Land. 
The name was approved by the Arkhangelsk Regional Executive Committee in 1963 (Decision No. 651).

 

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