Lavrov Mikhail Andreyanovich 
(02(14).09.1799-10(22).11.1882)


Navalman, hydrograph, Arctic explorer, admiral. 
Born in Arkhangelsk in the family of a nobleman, in 1816 he graduated from the Naval Cadet Corps. After completing his studies, he sailed for four years in the Baltic Sea, on transport “Mezen” sailed from Kronstadt to Arkhangelsk and back. 
In 1821 Lavrov was invited by F.P. Litke senior officer of the brig "Novaya Zemlya" to participate in expeditions to Novaya Zemlya. In all four campaigns, Lieutenant Lavrov showed himself from the best side. Immediately after the end of the Novaya Zemlya expeditions, he was assigned to the transport “Meek” to participate in a voyage around the world under the command of his friend Litke F.P. Wrangel. In subsequent years, Lavrov sailed on many vessels of the Baltic and Black Sea fleets, rising to the rank of captain of the 1st rank. 
In 1846, an incident occurred in his life that almost led to the collapse of his entire career. Lavrov refused to comply with the requirement of his chief, Rear Admiral Karpov, who ordered the allocation of sailors to work as his servants. Karpov was afraid to make this case public, but then with small unreasonable and humiliating cavils provoked Lavrov to a “bold response”, which in the fleet was equated with open disobedience. Despite the petition of his superiors, Lavrov was tried and demoted. Four years he passed the official ladder from the beginning. In 1850, he was given the rank of captain of the 1st rank and was dismissed. But every cloud has a silver lining. The outbreak of the Crimean War returned Lavrov to the ranks. For more than ten years he served as mayor of Taganrog, rising to the rank of full admiral. For success in service, Lavrov was awarded the Order of St. Stanislav 1 and 2 degrees, St. Ana 1 and 2 degrees, St. Vladimir 3 degrees. 
He died and was buried in the Sergius Desert in Strelna.
 The grave is not preserved.
The southern entrance cape of Melky Bay in the south-west of the northern island of Novaya Zemlya. Named in 1821 by F.P. Litke.

 

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